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Make gold based pinks, purples, ruby easier to work with

Make gold based pinks, purples, ruby easier to work with

Postby marcib » Thu Nov 23, 2017 11:36 am

Our gold based colors: the pinks , purples and rubies can be frustrating to work with because of grain issues and also they tend to be gummy.
Adding some lanolin when mixing the paints can help with the graininess.

Paula Collins showed us a trick to working with pinks : she pulled a glob of color onto her brush onto a tile, then added more oil to it and brush mixed it until it was creamy , then applied it. The extra oil helped get it on smoothly but you can't mess with it too much .


Karla Pendelton posted this to thelist ( 11/23/2017): ;thanks; Karla.
Gold bearing purples, pinks and rubies are wonderful and favorites of china
painters, because they are jewel like. These paints are particularly suited for the
decoration of porcelain bodies, but they are not without their problems. They are
subject to "clumping" when overworked, and china painters are vulnerable to
overworking due to the fact that most of the time we use slick paint on a slick
surface. Be watchful and try not to overwork gold-bearing colors. When clumping
occurs due to overwork, I know of nothing for it but to remove the paint and start
with fresh.
When I'm mixing a gold bearing paint that is already gritty, I first try Rachel's
method and mix with some lanolin. This usually works, but I've had older paints that
were stubborn and the lanolin did not solve the problem. These older gold bearing
paints are wonderful and I refuse to throw them out, but they must be ground using a
grinding glass tile and a glass pestle with a grinding surface. I grind the dry
paint with denatured alcohol, really putting some elbow grease and time into it. I
then allow the alcohol to evaporate, before taking a sample of the ground paint and
mixing it with a little Art-Aide medium. If I see that the paint is smoothed out and
usable, then I mix it all up and use it. Otherwise I grind again using the denatured
alcohol. Test again until the paint is smoothed and usable. This method of last
resort hasn't failed me...YET! However, the clumping due to overwork is still a
possibility no matter how smooth you grind a gold-bearing color. It simply is a
property of the paint that I know of no way to avoid. Rubies, maroons, burgundy and
dark pinks are especially vulnerable to overworking because they have the highest
gold content. SO DON'T OVERWORK THOSE ROSES! IF YOU DO... STOP, WIPE IT OFF, TAKE A
BREAK AND TRY AGAIN LATER!
Hope this helps those who are struggling with using gold-bearing paints. Have a
blessed and happy Thanksgiving holiday everyone!
Karla Pendleton
Marci >^..^< (x 8 )
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www.MarciBlattenberger.com
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Re: Make gold based pinks, purples, ruby easier to work wit

Postby marcib » Fri Nov 24, 2017 2:48 pm

Im adding this info from Dot Graves. ;rose2; Thanks, Dot!


I was told years ago to use a drop of gold essence with your gold colors when
grinding them with your mineral oil. Grind really well. The paints at that time
we're a lot grittier than they are now too. It does seem to help.
Marci >^..^< (x 8 )
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Location: Hendersonville, TN ( outside of Nashville)


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